Keep an eye out for Stinking Roger

NatureMapr News

A recent NatureMapr sighting in the Bega Valley Shire is a timely reminder to keep an eye out - and potentially remove! - this invasive weed. Once it gets away, this smelly plant can create huge infestations that are very (very!) difficult to eradicate.

Stinking Roger (Tagetes minuta) is a native plant of southern South America. It belongs to the family Asteraceae - the same family as many plant native species, as well as familiar garden plants such as daisies. Before removal, check that the plant is not actually a native Senecio species, such as Senecio bipinnatisectus.

  Tagetes minuta  (Stinking Roger)   - a widespread weed in NSW, north from Narooma.  Photo: Max Campbell, Brogo NSW

Tagetes minuta (Stinking Roger) - a widespread weed in NSW, north from Narooma. Photo: Max Campbell, Brogo NSW

  Tagetes minuta  (Stinking Roger) - grows to between 1-2 metres tall, often among roadside vegetation.  Photo: Max Campbell, Brogo NSW

Tagetes minuta (Stinking Roger) - grows to between 1-2 metres tall, often among roadside vegetation. Photo: Max Campbell, Brogo NSW

A strong and somewhat unpleasant smell from the foliage is a pretty good indicator that you have Stinking Roger. If you're unsure, lodge a sighting on NatureMapr - our Atlas of Life moderators and contributors may be able to assist in identification.

Link to the Plantnet description of Tagetes minuta.

If you discover small numbers of plants, or if it has just appeared on the road verge near you, then it is definitely worth going after it.  And the sooner the better, before it starts forming seed. 

If tackling it later, then cut and bag heads for burning or extreme heating in plastic bags in the sun to kill the seed. (Slashing seeding plants may simply spread the problem!)

Thanks to Max Campbell for adding this record to NatureMapr, and to Jackie Miles for tips on eradication.

For more information, see the Eurobodalla Shire Council website 

 

 

Kerri-Lee Harris